805 Goats

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FAQs

What will goats eat? 
Goats are not trained to eat any one specific plant, yet enjoy consuming many invasive species.  Below are a few of the invasive species consumed:

  • Poison Ivy
  • Chapparal
  • Thistle
  • Leafy Spurge
  • Honeysuckle
  • Multiflora Rose
  • Buckthorn
  • Vetch

Why goats?
Goats are grazers by nature and prefer weeds over grasses.  When eating, goats will consume the noxious weed vegetation first, consisting of eating all the flower heads and leaves, with only bare stock remaining.  With the elimination of the flower heads, the natural progression of the cycle is stopped immediately.  This effective process is drastically different from the conventional usage of power tools that simply cut the weeds and do nothing with the seeds, leaving them exposed to blow in the wind and begin germinating immediately.

  • No Dirty Chemicals or Toxic Weed Killers
  • Quiet- No Loud Equipment
  • Goats Create Natural Fertilizer
  • Long-term Solution to Weed Control and Vegetation Management
  • Natural Tilling of Soil
  • Goats are able to get in the areas that machinery can’t and humans don’t want to (rough terrain, poison ivy fields, wetlands, etc.)

I hear the term “Fire Mitigation", how is that connected with goats?
Overgrown vegetation and invasive species become heavy fuel loads for fires at any stage.  The result of goats grazing is similar to a low intensity fire.  Goats will reduce the volume thickness, height, and breadth of brush while restoring areas to their natural state.  Regeneration of the natural landscape is integral to healthy land. 

How do you keep the goats from running off?
We utilize portable electric mesh fencing and a solar-charged battery to contain the goats.  As the goats finish in a specific area, we’re able to easily move the fencing to accommodate the goats consumption on a specific job.

What about the goat droppings?  Does it smell and attract flies?

Goat manure is a natural fertalizer that helps produce healthier soil.  They produce neater pelletized droppings and their manure is oderless and does not attract insects as those of other larger grazing animals.